Beam

Beam,2013, acrylic on canvas, 16" x 12". Private collection.

Façade

2013. acrylic on canvas. 16" x 12". Collection: National Gallery of Canada

Inside Under

2013, acrylic on canvas, 15" x 12". Private collection.

Lightness

2013. acrylic on canvas. 15" x 12". Collection: National Gallery of Canada

Pillow

2012, acrylic on canvas, 10.25" x 10.25"

Platter

2013. acrylic on canvas. 11" x 12". Collection: National Gallery of Canada

Reversal

2013. acrylic on canvas. 15" x 12". Collection: National Gallery of Canada

Rollover

2012. acrylic on canvas. 12" x 9". Collection National Gallery of Canada

Sidelines II

2013. acrylic on canvas. 15" x 12". Collection: National Gallery of Canada

Sidelines

2012, acrylic on canvas, 10.25" x 10.25"

Tonque and Groove

2013, acrylic on canvas, 15" x 11"

Tuft

2012, acrylic on canvas, 10.25" x 11.75"

View

2013, 16 x 12, acrylic on canvas. Private collection.

Water Falling

2012, acrylic on paper, 14" x 11"

See Through

2013, oil on canvas, 48" x 36"

Edge

2013, oil on canvas, 40" x 36"

Ghost

2013, oil on canvas, 48" x 36"

Horizontal

2013, oil on canvas, 44" x 36"

Ring

2013, oil on canvas, 48" x 36"

Field Study

2013, oil on canvas, 44" x 36"

Light Up Red/Blue

2013, oil on canvas, 72" x 54". Collection Bank of Montreal

Ground Up

2013, oil on canvas, 72" x 54"

Blue Edge

2013, acrylic on canvas, 14" x 11"

No 5

2013, acrylic on canvas, 14" x 12"

Red Block

2013, acrylic on canvas, 14" x 12"

Blue stool

2013, acrylic on canvas, 14" x 12"

Corner

2012. Acrylic on linen.

French Curves

Renée Van Halm sees her subjects in terms of something else, meaning the generally overlooked fragmentary elements present in everyday images: furniture, shadows,vessels, and elements of architecture. Beginning with images pulled from mass media sources such as décor and fashion magazines, Van Halm replaces large portions of the image with smooth expanses of pure colour, borrowed from the delicate tones of origami paper. By using the existing proportional and compositional material given by the background material – straight lines, right angles, regular curves and parabolic curves – the artist is able to build subtle tensions between figuration and abstraction, thus disrupting the classic figure/ground, subject/object relationships.
Loaded with visual speculation, these paintings reflect on idiosyncracies of colour, textures of material and qualities of light found in the source materials, which are then translated through the very different material of paint pigment and the vocabulary of painted marks.

Sophie Brodovitch, 2013